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"Sticky Theory"

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Abstract:

This paper is about "sticky theory." The term was introduced by the
authors of this paper in a recently published introductory methods
textbook to highlight the importance of learning principles of evidence
and keeping an open mind to new information. The term is a metaphor
standing for a tendency to adhere to current beliefs even when they are
contradicted by available evidence.

We classify sticky theory into two types. Type I refers to beliefs
about matters that have little or no obvious immediate impact on one's
personal welfare, for example belief about the effectiveness of capital
punishment to deter crime. Type II sticky theory refers to beliefs
about matters that do have immediate impact on one's welfare, for
example, the decision to attend college.

Several examples of probable sources of sticky theory include social
influences accumulated since childhood, political party affiliation,
commercial advertising, and prejudicial beliefs about minority groups.
These sources are external to the welfare derived from choices and
hence are not easily reconciled with rational-choice theory.

A brief summary of basic rational-choice model is presented and a
sketch of an approach for incorporating nonrational components into the
model is proposed.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

belief (34), theori (30), sticki (23), one (19), decis (16), type (16), choic (14), ect (13), use (13), bene (13), model (12), evid (12), util (11), e (11), new (10), j (10), peopl (10), good (10), advertis (9), group (9), b (9),

Author's Keywords:

Rationality, theory, rational choice
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Association:
Name: American Sociological Association
URL:
http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p21989_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Dorsten, Linda. and Hotchkiss, Harold. ""Sticky Theory"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 <Not Available>. 2013-07-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p21989_index.html>

APA Citation:

Dorsten, L. and Hotchkiss, H. L. , 2005-08-12 ""Sticky Theory"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2013-07-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p21989_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper is about "sticky theory." The term was introduced by the
authors of this paper in a recently published introductory methods
textbook to highlight the importance of learning principles of evidence
and keeping an open mind to new information. The term is a metaphor
standing for a tendency to adhere to current beliefs even when they are
contradicted by available evidence.

We classify sticky theory into two types. Type I refers to beliefs
about matters that have little or no obvious immediate impact on one's
personal welfare, for example belief about the effectiveness of capital
punishment to deter crime. Type II sticky theory refers to beliefs
about matters that do have immediate impact on one's welfare, for
example, the decision to attend college.

Several examples of probable sources of sticky theory include social
influences accumulated since childhood, political party affiliation,
commercial advertising, and prejudicial beliefs about minority groups.
These sources are external to the welfare derived from choices and
hence are not easily reconciled with rational-choice theory.

A brief summary of basic rational-choice model is presented and a
sketch of an approach for incorporating nonrational components into the
model is proposed.

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