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The Military Participation Ratio (MPR) Update: Mobilization of Non-Active Duty Military Personnel

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Abstract:

Andreski (1954) assessed the impact of military power on social structure, introducing the concept of the Military Participation Ratio (MPR), or the proportion of the general population in military service. In the transition from labor-intensive to capital-intensive military operations, researchers tend to overlook the continuing significance of the MPR, arguing that the mobilization of human resources is no longer an adequate measure to evaluate the military power of a state. In the age of a small professional force, we argue that the MPR specifies the extent of the institutional presence of the military in society, capturing the dynamics between the military and the labor market. In order to adequately capture the militaryís institutional presence, we contend that it is necessary to distinguish among the shifting roles of active as well as reserve components, civilian employees of the armed forces, and defense contractors. Having done so, we can offer a more complete and telling story of the transformation of the American military over the last century. What stands out in this story of change then is the tremendous increase in importance of the reserve components since the end of the Cold War.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

militari (127), forc (89), mpr (79), war (78), compon (51), reserv (49), activ (48), american (46), mobil (44), societi (40), nation (39), duti (38), arm (28), polici (28), total (28), institut (28), social (27), presenc (27), servic (26), us (24), pattern (24),

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Armed Forces, Civil-military relations, Mobilization, United States
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Kurashina, Yuko., Kestnbaum, Meyer. and Segal, David. "The Military Participation Ratio (MPR) Update: Mobilization of Non-Active Duty Military Personnel" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p110783_index.html>

APA Citation:

Kurashina, Y. , Kestnbaum, M. and Segal, D. R. , 2004-08-14 "The Military Participation Ratio (MPR) Update: Mobilization of Non-Active Duty Military Personnel" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA, Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p110783_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Andreski (1954) assessed the impact of military power on social structure, introducing the concept of the Military Participation Ratio (MPR), or the proportion of the general population in military service. In the transition from labor-intensive to capital-intensive military operations, researchers tend to overlook the continuing significance of the MPR, arguing that the mobilization of human resources is no longer an adequate measure to evaluate the military power of a state. In the age of a small professional force, we argue that the MPR specifies the extent of the institutional presence of the military in society, capturing the dynamics between the military and the labor market. In order to adequately capture the militaryís institutional presence, we contend that it is necessary to distinguish among the shifting roles of active as well as reserve components, civilian employees of the armed forces, and defense contractors. Having done so, we can offer a more complete and telling story of the transformation of the American military over the last century. What stands out in this story of change then is the tremendous increase in importance of the reserve components since the end of the Cold War.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 21
Word count: 6469
Text sample:
The Military Participation Ratio (MPR) Update: Mobilization of Non-Active Duty Military Personnel Yuko Kurashina Meyer Kestnbaum and David R. Segal Department of Sociology University of Maryland College Park Abstract Andreski (1954) assessed the impact of military power on social structure introducing the concept of the Military Participation Ratio (MPR) or the proportion of the general population in military service. In the transition from labor-intensive to capital-intensive military operations researchers tend to overlook the continuing significance of the MPR arguing
State. Cambridge MA: Cambridge University Press. The United States Census of Bureau. 2001. Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2001. The United States Civil War Center. 2002. Statistical Summary: America‚Äôs Major Wars. (Available from http://www.cwc.lsu.edu/cwc/other/stats/warcost.htm). The United States Bureau of the Census. 1975. Historical Statistics of the United States Colonial Times to 1957. Van Doorn Jacques. 1975. ‚ÄúThe Decline of the Mass Army in the West.‚ÄĚ Armed Forces and Society 1(2): 147-157. Weede Erich. 1993. ‚ÄúThe Impact of Military


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