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The Power of Narratives: The Effect of Organ Donation Storylines on the Attitudes, Knowledge, and Behaviors of Donors and Nondonors

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Abstract:

Drawing on theories of social learning, social representations and the organ donation model, based on the theory of reasoned action, online surveys were used to examine the impact of 6 organ donation storylines of 4 television dramas (CSI: NY, Num3ers, House, and Grey’s Anatomy) on viewers’ attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors. Results revealed that viewers acquired knowledge from the content of each drama, despite the fact that some content was inaccurate. Viewers who were not organ donors prior to exposure to the dramas were more likely to decide to donate organs if the drama explicitly encouraged donation, portrayed characters revealing how they had become donors and discussed the merits of donating. Viewers were also more likely to become an organ donor if they were emotionally involved in the drama. Viewers who were organ donors prior to exposure were less likely to be influenced by the storylines and possessed more accurate knowledge than nondonors. Implications for using dramas to educate and motivate the public were discussed.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

organ (175), donat (132), donor (118), m (110), p (88), narrat (82), viewer (66), hous (64), stori (58), episod (57), power (50), 001 (49), storylin (49), grey (48), anatomi (48), media (47), transplant (45), 1 (45), 2 (42), attitud (38), social (38),

Author's Keywords:

Organ donation, narrative impact, entertainment education
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Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p168487_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Morgan, Susan., Movius, Lauren. and Cody, Michael. "The Power of Narratives: The Effect of Organ Donation Storylines on the Attitudes, Knowledge, and Behaviors of Donors and Nondonors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 <Not Available>. 2013-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p168487_index.html>

APA Citation:

Morgan, S. E., Movius, L. B. and Cody, M. J. , 2007-05-23 "The Power of Narratives: The Effect of Organ Donation Storylines on the Attitudes, Knowledge, and Behaviors of Donors and Nondonors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA Online <PDF>. 2013-12-15 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p168487_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Drawing on theories of social learning, social representations and the organ donation model, based on the theory of reasoned action, online surveys were used to examine the impact of 6 organ donation storylines of 4 television dramas (CSI: NY, Num3ers, House, and Grey’s Anatomy) on viewers’ attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors. Results revealed that viewers acquired knowledge from the content of each drama, despite the fact that some content was inaccurate. Viewers who were not organ donors prior to exposure to the dramas were more likely to decide to donate organs if the drama explicitly encouraged donation, portrayed characters revealing how they had become donors and discussed the merits of donating. Viewers were also more likely to become an organ donor if they were emotionally involved in the drama. Viewers who were organ donors prior to exposure were less likely to be influenced by the storylines and possessed more accurate knowledge than nondonors. Implications for using dramas to educate and motivate the public were discussed.

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