Citation

Regionalism, Party Building, and Rule of Law: Explaining the Strength of Regional Political Parties in India

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

Much of the literature in political science greets regional political parties with skepticism and suspicion. Prevailing explanations of the origins of regional parties rely primarily on regional economic or cultural grievances and sub-state nationalism. Given grievance- and nationalism-based explanations, scholars tend to view regional parties as evidence of failures in nation-building and vehicles for sub-state nationalism and potentially secession. This paper questions the conventional wisdom on regional parties by arguing that previous explanations fail to provide a convincing account of the emergence of regional parties in a polity in which voters do not cast their votes on the basis of parties’ polity proposals.
Instead, this paper suggests the rule of a law is the crucial variable determining how voters will formulate their vote choice and how politicians will behave. Under weak rule of law, when voters do not expect that a country’s laws will be fairly or uniformly enforced, voters do not formulate their votes in an effort to influence policy-making; they cast their votes in order to influence policy-implementation. As a result, voters focus primarily on the characteristics of individual candidates in order to infer which types of voters a politician will favor if elected. Under conditions of weak rule of law and non-policy voting, I identify two conditions that give rise to regional parties: the concentration of politically-salient candidate characteristics (very often ethnicity) and frequent coalition government.
The dispersion or concentration of particular politically-salient individual characteristics determines whether a party can adopt a single, coherent mobilization strategy and still appeal to a national audience (in the case of dispersed characteristics). Meanwhile, the presence of coalition government allows small parties to extract power and resources, thereby removing a strong disincentive for politicians in small, regional parties who are otherwise excluded from government under single-party majority governments.
Together therefore, these two variables explain the strength (or weakness) of regional parties in weak rule of law societies. The implication of this argument is that when rule of law is weak, the success of regional parties should not necessarily be interpreted as a mandate for autonomy/secession or a rejection of a broader national identity.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

parti (255), voter (204), politician (180), law (178), polici (170), region (149), rule (119), polit (97), candid (93), prefer (78), may (74), vote (71), nation (71), weak (59), strong (58), govern (56), attribut (56), like (55), implement (55), state (53), differ (49),
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: American Political Science Association
URL:
http://www.apsanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p211608_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Ziegfeld, Adam. "Regionalism, Party Building, and Rule of Law: Explaining the Strength of Regional Political Parties in India" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2013-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p211608_index.html>

APA Citation:

Ziegfeld, A. W. , 2007-08-30 "Regionalism, Party Building, and Rule of Law: Explaining the Strength of Regional Political Parties in India" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL Online <PDF>. 2013-12-15 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p211608_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Much of the literature in political science greets regional political parties with skepticism and suspicion. Prevailing explanations of the origins of regional parties rely primarily on regional economic or cultural grievances and sub-state nationalism. Given grievance- and nationalism-based explanations, scholars tend to view regional parties as evidence of failures in nation-building and vehicles for sub-state nationalism and potentially secession. This paper questions the conventional wisdom on regional parties by arguing that previous explanations fail to provide a convincing account of the emergence of regional parties in a polity in which voters do not cast their votes on the basis of parties’ polity proposals.
Instead, this paper suggests the rule of a law is the crucial variable determining how voters will formulate their vote choice and how politicians will behave. Under weak rule of law, when voters do not expect that a country’s laws will be fairly or uniformly enforced, voters do not formulate their votes in an effort to influence policy-making; they cast their votes in order to influence policy-implementation. As a result, voters focus primarily on the characteristics of individual candidates in order to infer which types of voters a politician will favor if elected. Under conditions of weak rule of law and non-policy voting, I identify two conditions that give rise to regional parties: the concentration of politically-salient candidate characteristics (very often ethnicity) and frequent coalition government.
The dispersion or concentration of particular politically-salient individual characteristics determines whether a party can adopt a single, coherent mobilization strategy and still appeal to a national audience (in the case of dispersed characteristics). Meanwhile, the presence of coalition government allows small parties to extract power and resources, thereby removing a strong disincentive for politicians in small, regional parties who are otherwise excluded from government under single-party majority governments.
Together therefore, these two variables explain the strength (or weakness) of regional parties in weak rule of law societies. The implication of this argument is that when rule of law is weak, the success of regional parties should not necessarily be interpreted as a mandate for autonomy/secession or a rejection of a broader national identity.

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Associated Document Available American Political Science Association
Associated Document Available Political Research Online
Abstract Only All Academic Inc.

Document Type: PDF
Page count: 32
Word count: 18529
Text sample:
Regionalism Party Building and Rule of Law: Explaining the Strength of Regional Political Parties in India Adam W. Ziegfeld Massachusetts Institute of Technology Paper prepared for presentation at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Chicago IL 1 September 2007 Draft: Please do not cite without the author’s permission Comments welcome. Ziegfeld 2 In April and May of 2004 nearly 390 million Indians went to the polls in India’s 14th general election. Of these 390 million roughly
Comparative Political Studies 38 (3): 304-326. Stokes Susan. 2005. Perverse Accountability: A Formal Model of Machine Politics with Evidence from Argentina. American Political Science Review 99 (3): 315-325. Van Houten Pieter. 2000. Regional Assertiveness in Western Europe: Political Constraints and the Role of Party Competition. Dissertation. University of Chicago. Watts Ronald L. 1999. Comparing Federal Systems. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press. Wilkinson Steven I. 2007. Explaining changing patterns of party-voter linkages in India. In Patrons Clients and Policies:


Similar Titles:
The Impact of Political Ideology and Government Structure on Information Technology Policy: A Comparison of Technologically Sophisticated Countries with Differing Types of Governments

Weak States, Strong Preferences?: A Multilevel Analysis of Social Policy Preferences


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.