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2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 5688 words || 
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1. Youn, Ted. ""If you are so smart, should you also be rich, famous, and powerful?": A study of status attainment of American Rhodes Scholars" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2017-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p184193_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Abstract

Generations of American Rhodes Scholarship winners have attained significant positions governing political, economic, and cultural institutions in the country. This analysis of 874 Scholars elected between 1947 and 1992 focuses on how these exceptional academic elites have obtained positions of leadership role, wealth and fame. The study finds that access to cultural resources enabled them to gain access to status hierarchy, namely credentials from elite schooling. The higher the position in status hierarchy, the greater the likelihood of having access to social ties and social networks in corresponding value dimension. Transforming cultural capital to social capital is the key to their success and their ability to monopolize social institutions.

Over the past fifty years, winners of Rhodes Scholarship have gained powerful public leadership roles as a result of accumulating cultural capital through elite schooling at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, an influence of an Oxford education over one’s awareness of international and public issues, and prestigious credentials from elite law schools, which enabled them to have access to corporate and civic boards, and social connections to governmental and social institutions.

The pathways to wealth among Rhodes Scholars once again were influenced by their education at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton. Their most prestigious form of higher education helped them to acquire professional credentials in law and medicine. As in the case of power, their credentials from elite professional schools led them to opportunities to monopolize corporate and civic boards. These decidedly enabled them to accumulate wealth.

The impact of elite credentials from Harvard, Yale, and Princeton along with their social connection to governmental and cultural institutions became an immensely important means to achieve fame and symbolic recognition.

The paper discusses important implications of these findings in light of the expanding democracy and a rising tide of meritocracy in higher education.

2005 - International Studies Association Words: 254 words || 
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2. Simon-Kumar, Rachel. "Is Qualitative Research also Quality Research? Debating the limits of Critical Scholarship" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2017-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p72159_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Scholars engaged in the field of 'empowerment' research-that is, research that has an overriding commitment to improve conditions of marginalized groups-will agree that, in the past decade or so, there has been a perceptible shift towards heuristic and interpretative frameworks that use both qualitative and quantitative methodologies. The gains of this paradigmatic shift are well acknowledged: through use of methods such as narrative analysis, in-depth interviews and reflexive writing, the voices of the disadvantaged, their experiences and needs, and their solutions to their own situations have a better opportunity to be articulated. In reality, however, the conduct and outcomes of qualitative research is anything but uniform across institutional settings, and tends to satisfy a range of agendas, some of which reify rather than destabilize power relations. This paper is an attempt to reflect on the author's own experiences and observed use of qualitative research, and seeks to ask the questions: When does qualitative research become interpretative or critical? And, realistically, when does critical research become empowering? These questions highlight some of the tensions in doing 'relevant' research, that which has policy applications as against a loyalty to post-modern and critical approaches. Researchers often are confronted with the need to compromise between process and end-outcome of the work they do, and in doing so, reframe empowerment from within the interests of their institutions. The author will draw on her experiences in academic and government-sponsored research in the fields of (a) gender and development and (b) evaluation policy research in New Zealand.

2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8312 words || 
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3. Kim, Sung Yeun., Lee, Yoo Min., Gramzow, Richard. and Biocca, Frank. "Effects of Modality-Interactivity in Exergames on Health Behavior Intentions: Moderating Role of Regulatory Focus (Also Featured in Virtual Conference)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 23, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2017-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p556260_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Can playing exergames motivate sedentary people to exercise? What aspects of exergames can facilitate people’s desires or intentions to engage in actual physical exercise? Will the type of self-regulatory goal-striving process that individuals adopt moderate their own health behavior? A 4 (levels of modality-interactivity) × 2 (levels of promotion focus) between-subjects experiment was conducted to explore the effect of modality-interactivity in augmented virtuality-based exergames on participants’ perceived presence, physiological reactivity (measured by heart rate), exergame playing intention, and exercise intention. The potential moderating role of individual regulatory focus also was examined. There was a significant main effect of exergame interactivity on presence, heart rate, and exergame playing intention, but not on exercise intention (N = 159). In addition, individual differences in regulatory focus significantly moderated psychological and psychophysiological reactions to the exergame playing experience.

2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8931 words || 
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4. Lin, Jih-Hsuan. "The Moderating Role of the Media Interactivity on the Relationship Between Video Game Violence and Aggression and the Mediating Role of Self-Concept (Also Featured in Virtual Conference)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 23, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2017-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p555783_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined the moderating effect of media interactivity on the relationship between video game violence and short-term aggression and the mediating role of self-concept. A total of 169 male undergraduate students participated in the experiment, which had a 2 (media interactivity: play vs. watch) × 2 (violence: violent vs. non-violent) factorial design. The results showed that media interactivity and violence significantly affected participants’ short-term aggressive affect. Media interactivity also had a main effect on systolic and diastolic blood pressure. A conditional moderating effect—in that participants who played the violent video game displayed greater aggressive affect and blood pressure than participants who watched the recorded violent game play—was also found. An interaction effect between media interactivity and violence was found for automatic self-concept. The current study extended existing literature and further demonstrated that media interactivity exhibited significant influence on media effects after controlling violent content.

2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 6808 words || 
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5. Kim, Sojung., Hopke, Jill. and Rojas, Hernando. "The Power of "Talking on the Phone": Effects of Mobile Technology on Social Divides (Also Featured in Virtual Conference)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 23, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2017-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p555888_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study attempts to understand how the use of new communication technology, specifically mobile phone use, is associated with offline homogeneous, heterogeneous communication, and political media use in the case of Colombia. Whether and how social stratification of the public may influence these relationship is also investigated. After conducting correlation and regression analyses, findings show that the use of mobile phone has a strong, positive main effect on facilitating all the outcome measures: offline homogeneous communication, heterogeneous communication, and political media use. The study also revealed that the more people use their mobile technologies to achieve social and political mobilization, the more frequently they seek political information through various media outlets. Most interestingly, our study finds significant interaction effects between mobile technology use and social stratum of individuals on heterogeneous communication and political media use, such that mobile phone use especially benefits people of lower social strata. Further discussion on the study findings is offered.

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