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2009 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 7571 words || 
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1. Rottinghaus, Brandon. and Nicholson, Chris. "Counting Congress In: Patterns of Success in Judicial Nomination Requests by Members of Congress to the President" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel Intercontinental, New Orleans, LA, Jan 07, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2017-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p276503_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The power to nominate and confirm federal judges is shared by the Congress and the President, yet our understanding of this practice is often obscured by a narrow focus on political factors in the president’s purview, on the confirmation or rejection stage (where Congress has negative power, not positive power) or on nominations the Supreme Court (where Congress has little say). However, few works explicitly address the role Congress plays in shaping the pre-selection pool for judicial nominees. In this article, we explore the pre-nomination process by examining judicial nomination requests from Members of Congress to the Eisenhower and Ford Administrations. We find that the characteristics of the nominee matter more than the characteristics of the nominator. Party affiliation of a nominee is the strongest predictive factor, along with nominations to lower courts and experience in the federal government, while senatorial courtesy and prior legislative and judicial experience has no effect. The results provide for a more comprehensive view of the nomination-confirmation process and suggest that characteristics of nominees, Congress and the president must be taken into account in describing judicial confirmation patterns.

2012 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 284 words || 
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2. Bressler, Michael. "Congress at War: How Congress Goes Public to Influence Presidential War Policy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 12, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2017-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p544497_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In considering relations between the president and Congress on foreign policy, two bodies of literature stand out. One investigates the extent to which foreign policy is subject to partisanship, with congressional voting behavior as the primary indicator of the levels of cooperation or dissent. The other examines how presidents use the media to frame foreign policy debates in ways that will allow them to win over public opinion and in the process weaken congressional opposition to their plans. Much less attention has been paid, however, to how members of Congress utilize the media to influence foreign policy. Recently, scholars specializing in Congress and political communication have begun to examine how members of Congress use the media to influence policy. This small but growing literature identifies who in Congress is “going public” to promote or oppose certain policies, examines how parties in Congress organize to make the most effective use of the media, and investigates the strategies media entrepreneurs in Congress employ to achieve their aims. Most of this work either focuses on domestic politics or doesn’t differentiate between domestic and foreign policy. Scholars have long viewed American foreign policy making as an “invitation to struggle” between the executive and legislative branches. The Vietnam and Iraq wars provide an opportunity to examine how members of Congress have gone public in an area of policy that is often assumed to belong to the president as commander in chief. Through a content analysis of public congressional speech during these two wars, this paper investigates who in Congress went public to influence the course and content of presidential war policy.

2007 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 30 words || 
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3. Kleinerman, Benjamin. "Congress, the Courts and Executive Power: Why Congress is not the Most Dangerous Branch" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, <Not Available>. 2017-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p142393_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines the growing unwillingness on the part of Congress to assert constitutional authority to check the president. It asks whether judicial activism has softened the congressional will.

2015 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 216 words || 
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4. Cardenas, Theresa. "The Tweet Delete of Congress: Congress and Deleted Post on Twitter" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 15, 2015 <Not Available>. 2017-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p951080_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since 2006, increasingly more politicians have joined, and are active on, social media networks, in order to reach out to constituents. However, politicians, such as Anthony Weiner, have started to find themselves in the middle of Twitter scandals and criticism, since their posts are openly available to the public. These ramifications may be leading politicians to delete their tweets, but thanks to the Sunlight Foundation and it’s website Politwoops deleted tweets by politicians are now archived and ripe for political research. This raises the question: Which members of Congress are deleting tweets and why? Thus, I conduct the first known qualitative study on Congress and deleted tweets, to determine what members may be trying to delete. An empirical analysis on raw data, including 500 deleted tweets by Congress members, was used to discover which posts, and by which members, are deleted more often. I hypothesize that Congress members, specifically Republican Senators, are more likely to delete negative tweets, such as post that are unprofessional, against their constituents’ views, or contain controversial issues, in order to ensure public support and avoid backlash. However, my findings, so far, have found that deleted tweets are more likely to be legislative in nature, rather than negative posts that could cost a member public support.

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