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2014 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7552 words || 
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1. Lee, Young-Im. "First Daughter, First Lady, and First Woman President: Geun-hye Park’s Presidential Campaign in 2012" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, The Hyatt Regency New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 08, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p695495_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, I am going to explore how gender stereotype shaped barriers and opportunities for Geun-hye Park’s successful presidential campaign in 2012. The late authoritarian leader’s daughter being the first woman president in South Korea drew domestic and international attention as well as raised concerns over the future of democracy in the relatively recently industrialized and democratized country.
Following a framework presented in Cracking the Highest Glass Ceiling edited by Rainbow Murray (2010), I am going to examine the gendered media coverage of Park in Presidential Election in terms of gender stereotypes, media framing, double binds, and external factors. I am going to conduct content analyses of the way five major newspapers in South Korea across the ideological spectrum framed the first woman presidential candidate for four months during her bid for the office, from the day she won the candidacy of Saenuri Party to Election Day. Through this study, I will assess how useful the existing theories and frameworks on women running for top national executive offices in explaining the role of gender in the recent presidential election in South Korea.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Doran, Kelly. and Waldron, Mary. "From First Sexual Intercourse to First Childbirth: Associations with Early Alcohol Use" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p962243_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although teen birthrates have declined in recent years, early childbearing continues to be a major public health concern in the US, with well-documented consequences for both parents and children. Continued research on risk factors associated with teen pregnancy is vital to creating more effective prevention and intervention programs. Existing studies support an association between alcohol use during the adolescent years and sexual risk behaviors predictive of teen pregnancy and childbearing, including early sexual onset (e.g., Calvert, Bucholz, & Steger-May, 2010). However, the present study is the first to examine the rate of transition from first sexual intercourse to first childbearing as a function of age at first alcohol use in both females and males.

Data were drawn from 8,115 (4,061 male and 4,054 female) youth (age M(SD) = 27.12 (2.74)) from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 Cohort (NLSY97), a large nationally representative sample of 4,385 female and 4,599 male respondents born between 1980 and 1984, who were first assessed in 1997 with annually-collected data available through 2010. Time-varying measures of prospectively-assessed ages at first alcohol use, first sexual intercourse, and first childbirth were derived from yearly self-report interviews. Cox proportional hazards (PH) regression was conducted predicting timing of childbearing from onset of sex as a function of first alcohol use, separately for females and males. Given our focus on risk during the teenage years, onset of sex and childbearing were right-censored at age 19. The Efron approximation (Efron, 1977) was used for survival ties. Results are presented as Hazard Ratios (HRs), with interactions by risk period computed to correct for observed PH violations.

In Cox models, alcohol use predicted a slower progression from first sex to first childbirth for both males and females. For females, the delay in transition was more pronounced, where onset of first alcohol use was associated with 57% reduced rate of transition from first sex to first childbearing. For males, over the risk period starting two years from first sex, first alcohol use was associated with a 33% reduced rate of transition to first childbearing. Differences by gender were confirmed in subsidiary analyses of data pooled across males and females. Here, we observed a significant interaction between gender and age at first drink, with females experiencing a longer delay in transition relative to males (p<0.001).

Interestingly, while early drinking is associated with early sex as well as early childbearing, results suggest that early alcohol use may work to delay the rate of transition from first sex to childbearing. On the surface such findings may appear nonsensical. However, the same pattern has been noted in research on timing of alcohol use and risk of alcohol dependence (Jackson, 2010), where delayed transition from first drink to dependence is observed despite higher cumulative risk of dependence associated with very early drinking. We recommend that future research examine mechanisms underlying observed delays, including timing of potentially earlier pregnancies and pregnancy desire or intention.

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 157 words || 
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3. Wong, Cara., Citrin, Jack. and Levy, Morris. ""English First” in the Twenty-First Century? Intergroup Attitudes about Bilingual Education and Multiculturalism in the U.S." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., Jun 29, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1253537_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Citrin et al (2001) found that in 1994, most Americans favored a “soft” version of multiculturalism while eschewing “harder” policies. However, they also found that there was a vanguard of younger and better educated respondents who expressed greater support for the centrality of group identities in politics and political judgments. In this paper, we examine whether that vanguard has come into its own as the country has become more diverse racially. Also, have the attitudes of whites and racial minorities diverged over the last two decades, with a greater potential for intergroup conflict now? We focus on the case of bilingual education and analyze experiments in three different surveys conducted in 2016 in California. We find both contiguity and consensus in support of English first — a prioritization grounded mainly in economic and pragmatic reasons — but not “English Only” — which would have excluded all other languages from the public sphere.

2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 38 pages || Words: 13856 words || 
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4. Walgrave, Stefaan. and Verhulst, Joris. "The First Time is the Hardest? A Cross-National and Cross-Issue Comparison of First-Time Protest Participants Based on Protest Surveys in Eight Countries." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152358_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: The study aims to extend the existing knowledge about the specific dynamics of first-time participation in protest events. Although we start to know quite a lot about political (protest) activism, we hardly have a cue who, why and how people participate in protest for their first time. To tackle that puzzle we rely on extensive and innovative protest survey evidence covering 21 separate demonstrations in eight countries across ten different issues. On the aggregate-level, we can predict quite well which demonstrations will attract many first-time participants. Tests clearly establish that demonstrations staged at the beginning of a protest cycle, large demonstrations, demonstrations of the old or of the new emotional movements, demonstrations populated by older people and people not belonging to organizations are on average attended by a larger share of first-time participants than other protest events. On the individual level, first-timers appear to be only marginally different from many-timers. Only age and organizational membership appear to be consistent predictors of first-timership. We find that the attitudes of the demonstrators about the protest issue and the way they relate to the other demonstrators play a modest role as well. Yet, it is only the combination and interplay of the individual- and aggregate-level determinants that produces satisfying results. Whether people protest for the first time or not depends on the supply on the protest market and on their individual dispositions.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 120 words || 
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5. Partlow-Lefevre, Sarah. "Bridging the First and Second Waves: Rhetorical Constructions of First Wave Feminism in Ms. Magazine, 1972-1980" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p426748_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: During the second wave of feminism in the United States, writers sought to reclaim feminist history in a way that functioned to ground their ideas and beliefs. In this essay I argue that Ms. magazine, the first mass mediated feminist periodical in the United States, chose to publish articles that rhetorically reproduced the ideals of the first wave of feminism in the United States throughout the 1970s. I focus on the rhetorical function of these historical constructions for women in the second wave including the foundational nature of the first wave, the re-articulation of particular first wave feminist ideas and the creation of common ground for second wave feminists to identify with their foremothers in the first wave.

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