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Showing 1 through 5 of 12,432 records.
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2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 26 pages || Words: 8346 words || 
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1. Axford, Barrie. and Huggins, Richard. "The Need for a Cultural Revolution in the Study of Global Systems: Why the Inclusion of Meaning in the Analysis of Globalization and Globality Produces a more Credible Picture of Global Complexity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2018-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p251767_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Appeals for a multi-dimensional and multi/inter-disciplinary approach to the study of global systems still lose out to varieties of methodological nationalism; while disciplines shy away form much that is intellectually foreign. Through attention to the soft features of globalization and enacted globality (largely cultural and motivational phenomena and the realms of meaning)and to the disciplines that promote such approaches (Sociology, Cultural Studies; Social Anthropology, Communication Studies and some areas of Geography) this paper offers reworking of disciplinary paradigms and a remoinder that a frenetic search for appropriate indicators of globalization cannot be confined to economic or narrowly conceived governance phenomena. In this respect it provides the basis for a critical global studies, one which is concerned with the making, reproduction, and transformation of global systems – with globality as a “constitutive framework” for all social relations. Culture is an intriguing zone of analysis for students of globalizationsand global systems,because of its relative neglect or cavalier treatment by researchers ofall persuasions. The paper argues that we treat culture as more than shorthand for some exotic conjunctional features of current globalization, and examine cultural phenomena as part of a description of new forms of sociality constituted through global processes. In the latter guise, culture becomes the realm of shared meanings and purposive action in systemic relationshipsconstitutive of and dependent on larger processes of the global system.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 12024 words || 
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2. Lim, Alwyn. "Organized Hypocrisy and Global Corporate Governance: National and Global Influences on Global Corporate Responsibility Disclosure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1008460_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Organized hypocrisy, where talk, decisions, and actions do not cohere, is an endemic feature of modern organizations, especially in the realm of global corporate responsibility (GCR). In the latter half of the twentieth century, international organizations have promoted voluntary corporate responsibility disclosure in response to global corporate governance concerns, but with largely uneven results. This paper examines various firm, national, and global factors that facilitate or mitigate organized hypocrisy in GCR disclosure practices among corporations worldwide. Analyzing quantitative data on more than 1,700 disclosure reports submitted by corporations to the Global Reporting Initiative, this paper presents two main findings. First, external actors play significant roles in shaping GCR disclosure. Third-party organizations that verify corporations’ disclosure practices help mitigate organized hypocrisy while existing corporate disclosures in a company’s country of origin facilitates organized hypocrisy. Second, global factors such as world society ties help mitigate organized hypocrisy in GCR disclosure practices in lower-income countries while it is national factors such as a country’s legal tradition that reduces organized hypocrisy in GCR disclosure in higher-income countries. The paper concludes by discussing the implications of organized hypocrisy and GCR disclosure for attempts to address global corporate governance concerns.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 14854 words || 
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3. Struna, Jason. "Global Chains, Global Workers: Warehouse Workers’ Experience of Globalized Labor Processes and Transnational Class Relations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p563636_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Transnational class formation, by definition, implies that both sides of the labor-capital relation undergo transformations in the experience of class-life as it unfolds in spatial and productive contexts. While theoretical progress on the features of the global working class has been made, there has been relatively little empirical research on this topic. This paper fills this gap by examining the lived experiences of workers engaged in transnational commodity circuits in order to flesh out the emergent features of a transnational proletariat. I focus on the shop floor relationships and conditions experienced by workers in the third-party logistics industry of Southern California. Evidence from semi-structured interviews with warehouse and distribution center workers — individuals who labor in facilities that form key nodes in global commodity circuits — is presented in order to contextualize transnational labor-capital relations, the relationships that workers have with one another in local and cross-border circumstances, and management’s attempted exploitation of divisions between diasporic and static fractions of the transnational working class.

2015 - ARNOVA’s 44th Annual Conference Words: 139 words || 
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4. Shorette, Kristen., Rademacher, Heidi. and Coburn, Carolyn. "Global Civil Society in Global Markets? Fair Trade Consumption Across the Global North" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ARNOVA’s 44th Annual Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2018-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1052647_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This research examines the role of global civil society in the formation and expansion of markets. In particular, we analyze the uneven formation and expansion of fair trade markets across the global North. A common contemporary form of fair trade uses product-level certification systems and third-party regulators to evaluate the implementation of fair trade standards. Focusing on this form of fair trade in which the market regulated at the product level dominates, we use fair trade sales data provided by Fairtrade International and Fair Trade USA which comprises the majority of the contemporary fair trade market. Data are total sales of fair trade goods across 30 countries from 1994 to 2013. Preliminary results indicate that national levels of connectedness to global civil society, measured as citizen memberships in international nongovernmental organizations, predicts a larger domestic fair trade market.

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