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2003 - American Association for Public Opinion Research Words: 222 words || 
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1. Haggerty, Catherine. and O'Muircheartaigh, Colm. "Interviews of Leaseholders in Chicago's Housing Authority: A Comparison of Data Collected by Public Housing Residents and Non-Public Housing Residents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Sheraton Music City, Nashville, TN, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p116226_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Several years ago the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA) announced a “Plan for Transformation” which included the relocation of all public housing residents over a ten-year period. The MacArthur Foundation is funding research to help the CHA improve the relocation process; NORC is collecting data from public housing residents to inform relocation improvements.

During the planning phase of the project various groups interested in the improvement process talked about both the benefits and drawbacks of using public housing residents to collect these data. Those in-favor of using public housing residents to collect the data argued that public housing residents are more comfortable talking to other public housing residents and more likely to honestly disclose their experiences. Those not-in-favor of using public housing residents as interviewers argued that public housing residents are angry with the CHA and may influence respondents’ answers.

NORC recruited and hired half of the interviewing staff for this project from within the CHA developments. NORC randomly assigned half of the addresses in each building to CHA resident interviewers and the other half to non-CHA resident interviewers. The paper will describe the interviewer recruiting and hiring process, the interviewer training, and the operational strategies employed during data collection. The paper will also examine and compare the data collected by CHA resident interviewers and non-CHA resident interviewers.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Osborne, Melissa. "Who Gets “Housing First”? Determining Eligibility in an Era of Housing First Homelessness" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1253603_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The national shift to a “Housing First” approach to homelessness has moved many providers away from the restrictive facets associated with the formerly dominant “Housing Readiness” approach. While the adoption of the Housing First approach has led to some increased volume and efficiency in placing individuals into housing, this paper complicates this progress by demonstrating how organizational facets and cultural expectations converge during eligibility determination processes and produce unequal experiences and access to housing services. Drawing on two years of ethnographic fieldwork at a non-profit organization in the Midwest, this project demonstrates that the formal implementation of “target populations” and the Vulnerability Index reinforces normative beliefs about gender and vulnerability and that these beliefs shape providers’ understandings about what types of people have legitimate claims to social support – or who, in other words, are the “truly vulnerable” homeless. Although this system efficiently benefits many individuals, it simultaneously produces barriers to support for those who are homeless but unable to meet organizational and/or cultural expectations for vulnerability, and, therefore, for housing eligibility. In effect, this system has produced a climate where merely being homeless is no longer enough for a client to be considered sufficiently vulnerable for receiving housing.

2017 - Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action Words: 209 words || 
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3. De La Morena Lopez, Irene., Miranda, Daniela., Garcia-ramirez, Manuel. and Escobar-Ballesta, Marta. "Housing and Wellbeing: Advocating for Improved Housing Conditions by Local Roma Neighbors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1238723_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This contribution synthesizes the work done to mobilize Roma neighbors in dignifying their housing conditions and struggle against the unhealthy surroundings in a disenfranchised neighborhood in Seville, Spain. Roma are the largest Spanish ethnic minority and have an extensive history of discrimination. Health inequities such as infectious diseases, domestic accidents, or poor sanitation and nutrition due to lack of running water and electricity are a consequence of poor housing conditions as a key expression of this systemic marginalization. Commitment and active participation of the Roma are main assets to overcome these inequities. Hence, we propose a multi-level advocacy initiative to provoke transformative changes within the multiple settings of a disenfranchised community context. This process consists of building capacity and empowerment among a group of Roma neighbors and community based organizations and public institutions towards dignifying local Roma housing. This will result in the transformation of at-risk local neighbors into agents of change, moving from a sense of helpless to empowerment. Through a PhotoVoice initiative Roma neighbors built critical thinking regarding the connection between health problems and unhealthy structural and environmental conditions. Together with the rest of stakeholders, a shared understanding was raised in a in a safe and symmetrical environmental on the actions to address Roma housing inequities.

2015 - 15th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action Words: 147 words || 
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4. Jetté, Jonathan. "Moving toward a better understanding of the cost of housing people without housing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 15th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, UMass Lowell Inn & Conference Center, Lowell, MA, Jun 25, 2015 <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p994839_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In today’s economic world, it is most important to prove the financial efficiency of a program to receive funding. Over time multiple economic analyses have shown that the Housing First program model reduces costs associated with heath care and the use of the criminal justice system by people with histories of chronic homelessness (Culhane, Metraux,& Hadley,2003; Basu, Kee,Buchanan,& Sadowski,2012; Gulcur, Stefancic, Shinn, Tsemberis, & Fischer, 2003).
This presentation will cover the methodology and the results of the cost effectiveness analysis of a quasi-experimental two-year research project that looked at a Housing First program in Ottawa that targeted formerly homeless people living with an addiction problem. A second objective covered by the presentation will be to develop a deeper understanding of the factors that influence cost fluctuations in research on Housing First programs: the duration of the intervention, individual participant variables and the response to treatment.

2016 - 87th SPSA Annual Conference Words: 254 words || 
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5. Cain, Sean. "The Committee of the Whole and Bill Cosponsorship in the U.S. House of Representatives: The Case of the Non-voting House Members" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 87th SPSA Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Jan 07, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1080039_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I reassess preference-based and position-taking explanations of legislative cosponsorship (Mayhew, 1974; Krehbiel, 1995; Koger, 2003) with a set of under-examined cases: the six non-voting members of the U.S. House from the insular territories and the District of Columbia. These members cannot vote on the House floor but sit on committees and can sponsor and cosponsor bills. During three Congresses—the 103rd, 110th, and 111th—changes to the House rules permitted them to vote in Committee of the Whole proceedings. In subsequent Congresses, these rules changes were revoked, creating a natural experiment setting in which to test a preference-based hypothesis against a partisan one. If preferences drive cosponsorship, I expect little change from before, to during, to after the floor voting rules change for the non-voting House members, relative to other representatives, and that the type of bills they cosponsor do not differ much, as I do not expect their issue or ideological preferences to change significantly. The Democrats held a majority in each of these three Congresses, and all but one of the non-voting House members serving under the modified rules caucused with them. A partisan explanation of cosponsorship expects that their cosponsoring increases with the opportunity to be included in majority coalitions, and that they cosponsor more bills championed by the majority leadership. This study’s focus on the non-voting House members is a means to understand whether procedures such as the Committee of the Whole, which increases party voting (Roberts and Smith, 2003), influence cosponsorship activity more generally.

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