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2003 - American Association for Public Opinion Research Words: 222 words || 
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1. Haggerty, Catherine. and O'Muircheartaigh, Colm. "Interviews of Leaseholders in Chicago's Housing Authority: A Comparison of Data Collected by Public Housing Residents and Non-Public Housing Residents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Sheraton Music City, Nashville, TN, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2018-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p116226_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Several years ago the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA) announced a “Plan for Transformation” which included the relocation of all public housing residents over a ten-year period. The MacArthur Foundation is funding research to help the CHA improve the relocation process; NORC is collecting data from public housing residents to inform relocation improvements.

During the planning phase of the project various groups interested in the improvement process talked about both the benefits and drawbacks of using public housing residents to collect these data. Those in-favor of using public housing residents to collect the data argued that public housing residents are more comfortable talking to other public housing residents and more likely to honestly disclose their experiences. Those not-in-favor of using public housing residents as interviewers argued that public housing residents are angry with the CHA and may influence respondents’ answers.

NORC recruited and hired half of the interviewing staff for this project from within the CHA developments. NORC randomly assigned half of the addresses in each building to CHA resident interviewers and the other half to non-CHA resident interviewers. The paper will describe the interviewer recruiting and hiring process, the interviewer training, and the operational strategies employed during data collection. The paper will also examine and compare the data collected by CHA resident interviewers and non-CHA resident interviewers.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 142 words || 
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2. Clark, Kendra. and Pyrooz, David. "Restricting More Than Housing: The Effects of Restrictive Housing on Recidivism Among Juveniles" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2018-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1149420_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: The placement of inmates into restrictive housing--or, more well known as solitary confinement--is a common practice in American jails, prisons, and juvenile facilities. A recent estimate indicates that anywhere from 80,000 to 100,000 inmates in U.S. prisons were in restrictive housing. The evidence of the consequences of restrictive housing is inconclusive, according to Frost and Monteiro (2016), the authors of a recent National Institute of Justice white paper. Even less clear are the consequences of restrictive housing among juveniles. Drawing from a variety of theoretical perspectives, this study examines the effects of restrictive housing on recidivism among juvenile offenders using longitudinal data and a matched samples analytic strategy. Results of the current study will be contrasted against the current state of the literature and will speak to recent policy initiatives surrounding the placement of offenders generally, and juveniles particularly, in restrictive housing.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 3439 words || 
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3. Arena, John. "Why Does Angela Glover Blackwell Hate Public Housing? The Ideological Foundations of Public Housing Dismantlement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2018-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1006993_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The intellectual work of, and political intervention by, renowned American sociologist William Julius Wilson (WJW) has played a crucial role in legitimating the destruction of public housing in the late 20th and early 21st century. Yet, to understand the intellectual roots of WJW’s work and distinctiveness his political contribution to dismantling public housing, we have to examine the Chicago School of Sociology (CSS) of the early 20th century and that of sociologist Daniel Patrick Moynihan in the middle of the last century. I then turn to pre and post-Katrina to examine how a variety of actors mobilized these ideas to normalize the dismantlement of public housing communities and displacement of thousands of low-income black families.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 39 pages || Words: 11394 words || 
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4. Peake, Jeffrey., Krutz, Glen. and Jatkowski III, Walt. "The Forgotten House? Treaties, Executive Agreements, and the Role of the U.S. House of Representatives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2018-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p211380_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Most studies of Congress and the treaty process have quite logically focused on the United States Senate, given its Constitutional role in advice and consent. Scholars have focused little attention on the House of Representatives when studying the domestic politics of international agreements. Given the rise of the modern executive agreement, the House has become a significant player in formulating American diplomatic policies. Our central argument is that the House of Representatives, which we characterize as “forgotten,” is indeed a very active participant in the process through the staging of congressional hearings on treaties and executive agreements and by taking the lead on treaty implementation legislation. We examine congressional hearings on international agreements since 1973 and find that the House plays an important role in vetting and oversight of international agreements. An analysis of the likelihood of the House version of a treaty implementation bill to become the ultimate legislative vehicle suggests also indicates the significance of the House.

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 7041 words || 
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5. Carter, George. "Explaining the Black/White Housing Gap: the Effects of Segregation on Housing Quality and Ownership" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2018-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p107422_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research on housing quality and homeownership has suggested that African-Americans at all income levels live in lower quality housing and have lower home ownership rates than comparable whites. While we know these discrepancies exist, the question of why they exist has not been conclusively answered. Some researchers have pointed to the possible role of discrimination and segregation in these discrepancies, but few studies have tested these ideas empirically. To date, studies that address segregation in analyzing housing outcomes have focused on individual cities rather than on national level trends. Addressing these gaps in the literature, this study uses national data from the 1997 American Housing Survey (AHS) and the 1990 Census to examine the effects of residential segregation and African-American headship on home ownership and two measures of housing quality: housing inadequacy and overcrowding. Residential segregation was found to have strong impacts on increasing housing inadequacy and overcrowding for African-Americans in the United States. Findings concerning the relation between African-American headship, segregation, and homeownership were more ambiguous and call for future exploration. Suggestions for longitudinal research and housing policy implications are discussed.

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