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2003 - American Association for Public Opinion Research Words: 222 words || 
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1. Haggerty, Catherine. and O'Muircheartaigh, Colm. "Interviews of Leaseholders in Chicago's Housing Authority: A Comparison of Data Collected by Public Housing Residents and Non-Public Housing Residents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Sheraton Music City, Nashville, TN, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2017-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p116226_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Several years ago the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA) announced a “Plan for Transformation” which included the relocation of all public housing residents over a ten-year period. The MacArthur Foundation is funding research to help the CHA improve the relocation process; NORC is collecting data from public housing residents to inform relocation improvements.

During the planning phase of the project various groups interested in the improvement process talked about both the benefits and drawbacks of using public housing residents to collect these data. Those in-favor of using public housing residents to collect the data argued that public housing residents are more comfortable talking to other public housing residents and more likely to honestly disclose their experiences. Those not-in-favor of using public housing residents as interviewers argued that public housing residents are angry with the CHA and may influence respondents’ answers.

NORC recruited and hired half of the interviewing staff for this project from within the CHA developments. NORC randomly assigned half of the addresses in each building to CHA resident interviewers and the other half to non-CHA resident interviewers. The paper will describe the interviewer recruiting and hiring process, the interviewer training, and the operational strategies employed during data collection. The paper will also examine and compare the data collected by CHA resident interviewers and non-CHA resident interviewers.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10142 words || 
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2. Hernandez, Diana. "Affording Housing at the Expense of Health: Exploring the Housing and Neighborhood Strategies of Poor Families" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2017-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p724285_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Low-income families often simultaneously encounter housing and neighborhood problems including safety, affordability and quality issues that necessitate strategies which maximize limited budgets and ensure safety. These constrained decisions regarding inadequate housing and neighborhood conditions, however, may create or exacerbate health risks. Building on the survival strategies literature, this paper offers rich and detailed accounts of coping and management strategies on the part of vulnerable families facing housing and neighborhood hardships. The findings are based on in-depth interviews with 72 respondents and ethnographic observations in an urban community. The results illustrate how low-income women avoid neighborhood danger by relegating family life to the home environment, thereby increasing exposure to health risks such as stress, depression and asthma. The discussion focuses on public health literature linking housing and health and proposes the use of legal strategies and community engagement as resources to complement current approaches to housing and neighborhood problems.

2015 - 15th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action Words: 152 words || 
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3. Ecker, John., Aubry, Tim., Farrell, Susan., Klodawsky, Fran. and Hay, Elizabeth. "Individual, Housing, and Neighbourhood Level Predictors of Psychological Integration Among Vulnerably Housed and Homeless Individuals" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 15th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, UMass Lowell Inn & Conference Center, Lowell, MA, Jun 25, 2015 <Not Available>. 2017-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p995756_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Psychological integration is a benchmark within community psychology practice. The current longitudinal study evaluated the individual, housing, and neighbourhood level predictors of psychological integration among a population of homeless and vulnerably housed individuals. Participants were recruited at homeless shelters, meal programs, and rooming houses in Ottawa and participated in three in-person interviews, each approximately one year apart. Prospective and cross-sectional predictors of psychological integration at follow-up 1 and follow-up 2 were examined. There were 397 participants at baseline, 341 at follow-up 1 and 320 at follow-up 2. A hierarchical multiple regression uncovered several significant predictors of psychological integration. The most salient and common predictors were being older, having greater social support, living in high quality housing, and residing in a neighbourhood with a positive impact. Implications for service provision and policy advancements to better address psychological integration among homeless and vulnerably housed individuals are discussed.

2015 - 15th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action Words: 147 words || 
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4. Jetté, Jonathan. "Moving toward a better understanding of the cost of housing people without housing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 15th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, UMass Lowell Inn & Conference Center, Lowell, MA, Jun 25, 2015 <Not Available>. 2017-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p994839_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In today’s economic world, it is most important to prove the financial efficiency of a program to receive funding. Over time multiple economic analyses have shown that the Housing First program model reduces costs associated with heath care and the use of the criminal justice system by people with histories of chronic homelessness (Culhane, Metraux,& Hadley,2003; Basu, Kee,Buchanan,& Sadowski,2012; Gulcur, Stefancic, Shinn, Tsemberis, & Fischer, 2003).
This presentation will cover the methodology and the results of the cost effectiveness analysis of a quasi-experimental two-year research project that looked at a Housing First program in Ottawa that targeted formerly homeless people living with an addiction problem. A second objective covered by the presentation will be to develop a deeper understanding of the factors that influence cost fluctuations in research on Housing First programs: the duration of the intervention, individual participant variables and the response to treatment.

2016 - 87th SPSA Annual Conference Words: 254 words || 
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5. Cain, Sean. "The Committee of the Whole and Bill Cosponsorship in the U.S. House of Representatives: The Case of the Non-voting House Members" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 87th SPSA Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Jan 07, 2016 <Not Available>. 2017-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1080039_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I reassess preference-based and position-taking explanations of legislative cosponsorship (Mayhew, 1974; Krehbiel, 1995; Koger, 2003) with a set of under-examined cases: the six non-voting members of the U.S. House from the insular territories and the District of Columbia. These members cannot vote on the House floor but sit on committees and can sponsor and cosponsor bills. During three Congresses—the 103rd, 110th, and 111th—changes to the House rules permitted them to vote in Committee of the Whole proceedings. In subsequent Congresses, these rules changes were revoked, creating a natural experiment setting in which to test a preference-based hypothesis against a partisan one. If preferences drive cosponsorship, I expect little change from before, to during, to after the floor voting rules change for the non-voting House members, relative to other representatives, and that the type of bills they cosponsor do not differ much, as I do not expect their issue or ideological preferences to change significantly. The Democrats held a majority in each of these three Congresses, and all but one of the non-voting House members serving under the modified rules caucused with them. A partisan explanation of cosponsorship expects that their cosponsoring increases with the opportunity to be included in majority coalitions, and that they cosponsor more bills championed by the majority leadership. This study’s focus on the non-voting House members is a means to understand whether procedures such as the Committee of the Whole, which increases party voting (Roberts and Smith, 2003), influence cosponsorship activity more generally.

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