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2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7893 words || 
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1. Rodriquez, Jason. "Family Members As Team Members in Intensive Care" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2017-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1006358_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Hospital care is becoming more patient-centered and team-based, without much consideration to how those two transformations interact. Based on 500 hours of fieldwork in an intensive care unit and 34 interviews with unit staff, this article examines how an ICU that was committed to patient-centered, team-based care managed the role of patients’ families as contingent members of the ICU team. Medical teamwork on the unit seemed to include families and did in some ways, such as in their participation in medical rounds. Yet in other ways, physicians deflected and resisted unwanted family participation. Nurses had less authority to control the terms of family involvement. Staff members, especially nurses, felt intense unhappiness at being forced to care on the rare occasions when patients’ families contested the unit’s treatment regimen. This article highlights the limits of medical teamwork and challenges widely accepted claims about the new respect for patient autonomy.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Abu Bakar, Hassan. and McCann, Robert. "Self-Perceived Leader-Member Dyadic Communication and Similarity on Group Member Behaviors: A Longitudinal Examination" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2017-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1080614_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research investigate the interaction effect between leader-member dyadic communication agreement and similarity (actual and perceived) on group member performance and organizational citizenship behavior at various points in the lifecycle of a workgroup. Longitudinal data from 6 studies on 141 matching dyads in 28 group’s projects were used. Both leader’s and member’s perceptions on dyadic communication was assessed at two points (Time 1and 3) and perception on similarity (Time 2 and 4) used to predict group leader’s perceived ratings of OCB in Time 5 and performance in Time 6 during groups’ life cycles. Results of hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analyses indicate that the effect for leader-member dyadic communication agreement and perceived similarity occurs from the beginning to the end of the group’s lifecycle. These findings show that effects for leader-member dyadic communication agreement on OCB and group member performance differ depending on the attraction-similarity hypothesis that is based on initial communication between group leaders and group members, which then leads to agreement on communication and similarity

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 16 pages || Words: 4081 words || 
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3. Fredrick, Tim. "Doing “Being a Good Audience Member”: Audience Members Accomplishing Contradictory Tasks during an Informational Presentation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2017-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p306844_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores an insert expansion sequence initiated by audience members during an informational presentation given during a staff meeting at a large, urban university. The sequence begins with a so-prefaced first pair part which offers the audience member’s candidate understanding of information presented, followed by the presenter’s confirmation of the candidate understanding, and the initiator’s acceptance of the confirmation. The author argues that this particular sequence, more so than other insert expansions initiated by audience members during the presentation, accomplishes two tasks of doing “being a good audience member”: (a) monitoring their own understanding of what the speaker says and clarifying misunderstandings and (b) displaying understanding in order to reassure the presenter that he or she is making sense. The analysis concludes that this sequence serves primarily as repair, but is initiated in such a way as to not threaten the presenter’s status as “knower” and his demeanor during the presentation.

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