Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 656 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 132 - Next  Jump:
2016 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 101 words || 
Info
1. Hodes, Caroline. "Fish, Land, Locke and Law: “Part of our Make-up…Part of our Self…Part of our Being”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Palais des congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Nov 10, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1138878_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper will problematize the rules in Canadian anti-discrimination claims. In equality rights litigation, iterations of belonging are circumscribed by legal tests that define identity as a set of immutable, embodied characteristics. In this context, both litigants and interveners are expected to identify in ways that individualize the structural and systemic violence of dispossession. Following Eve Tuck and Wayne Yang’s (2012) assertion that “decolonization is not a metaphor”, this paper proposes that feminist sociolegal scholarship ought to rethink notions of identity, inclusion, recognition, the human and the extra-human in order to untether corporeality from the logic of settler colonial modernity.

2010 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Pages: unavailable || Words: 2749 words || 
Info
2. Nordlund, Moya. "Essential Skills: Standards and Assessment (Part II of a two-part paper)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, China Conservatory of Music (CC) and Chinese National Convention Centre (CNCC), Beijing, China, Aug 01, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p397803_index.html>
Publication Type: Full Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Finding ways of assessing student musical understanding is necessary to effectively integrate MTNA's essential skills into pedagogy. One valid, coherent way for a teacher to systematically assess student progress is to precisely measure them against a set of standards, or levels of advancement. For instance, “standards” often refer to statements of expectations for student learning, including content standards, performance (skills) standards, and benchmarks. Second, the MENC National Standards are organized by skill and content standards with 4th-, 8th-, and 12th-grade benchmarks. Third, the Royal Schools of Music (RSM) in England examinations are internationally-recognized levels of advancement and the RSM Board publishes accompanying curriculum guides assisting teachers to develop the requisite skills in their students. According to Phyllis Pieffer, the MTNA Board of Directors decided to use the word “skills” instead of “standards” because “the latter would require students to attain a certain level of advancement that may or may not be possible.” Finally, I believe otherwise: standards are needed as a guide for measuring student progress and making instructional decisions. Whether called standards, benchmarks, or expectations, these outcomes become targets for assessment. Assessing skills acquisition will create a dynamic learning experience.

2007 - American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Words: 279 words || 
Info
3. Burns, Kimberly. "Medicare Part D and Pharmacy Students: Preparing Future Pharmacists for Medicare Part D Challenges." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Disney’s Yacht & Beach Club Resort, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, Jul 14, 2007 <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p187859_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Objectives: The initial and continuing implementation of the Medicare Part D outpatient prescription drug benefit has greatly impacted the practice of pharmacy. In addition to turning to pharmacists to dispense prescription drugs covered by Part D plans, millions of Medicare beneficiaries also call upon pharmacists for information and guidance in order to make informed decisions in plan selection. A Medicare Part D elective course was offered to help determine appropriate teaching methods to prepare students for these ongoing challenges.
Methods: Three methods were combined to educate and expose pharmacy students to Medicare Part D. These included: didactic lecturing and guest speakers from the local, state and national level; community outreach events coinciding with Part D open enrollment; and group research projects incorporating a Part D topic. At the completion of the course, students were surveyed on their understanding of Medicare Part D and their perceived value of the community outreach events and research projects.
Results: Based on student assessment, the various methods used were effective for the students understanding and application of Medicare Part D concepts. Students were able to learn the complexities of Medicare Part D; apply their understanding of Medicare Part D to assist the community; and successfully complete and present a research project involving a Medicare Part D topic.
Implications: This elective course model will be used to educate and prepare future pharmacy students regarding Medicare Part D, and to continue providing valuable service to the community and local Medicare beneficiaries.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Words: 190 words || 
Info
4. Menkhaus, Kenneth. "Part of the Solution and Part of the Problem: State-Building, Stabilization, and Humanitarian Intervention in Threat Reduction Strategies in Africa" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p499623_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Africa’s failed and fragile states are widely understood to pose a range of security threats to their own citizens, regional neighbors, and the world, though the specific types and severity of threats posed by “ungoverned space” remains the subject of debate. The international community has sought to reduce the threats posed by failed and war-torn states by promoting state-building, typically via power-sharing accords in transitional governments brokered as part of a mediated end to civil war. These efforts are usually coupled with humanitarian response and promotion of economic recovery, and in over a dozen African states have included insertion of international peacekeeping forces. While some external intervention in Africa has produced successes, others have not only failed but appear to have actually worsened the very security threats they were intended to reduce. This paper asks the question “under what conditions and to what extent do externally sponsored statebuilding, peacebuilding, humanitarian response, and stabilization operations in Africa inadvertently contribute to new security threats?” It explores cases in the Horn of Africa to explore this question from a comparative perspective, drawing on the author’s twenty years of research experience in the region.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 12967 words || 
Info
5. Fullerton, Andrew., Dixon, Jeffrey. and McCollum, Destinee. "The Institutionalization of Part-Time Work: Cross-National Differences in the Relationship between Part-Time Work and Perceived Insecurity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p726277_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The global rise of non-standard employment is often cited as one of the most important reasons for increasing levels of insecurity over the last 40 years. Yet, non-standard work is also one of the most underdeveloped factors in the literature on perceived worker insecurity. In this paper, we seek to understand the relationship between the most common form of non-standard employment, part-time work, and perceived worker insecurity. We focus on three types of perceived worker insecurity: cognitive job insecurity (perceived likelihood of job loss), labor market insecurity (perceived difficulty of finding a new, comparable job), and affective job insecurity (worrying about the potential threat of job loss). We develop a model of the “institutionalization of part-time work” and test this model using individual-level data for male and female workers from the 2005 ISSP linked to country-level data on various labor market characteristics. At the individual level, the results indicate that part-time work is generally associated with greater cognitive job insecurity for men; less labor market insecurity for men; and, less affective job insecurity for both genders. At the country level, the size of the part-time workforce is not associated with average levels of cognitive job insecurity, but it is generally associated with lower average levels of affective job insecurity, and to a lesser extent, labor market insecurity. Additionally, the size of the part-time workforce has a stronger effect for women than men. Finally, individual-level part-time work interacts significantly with several country-level indicators of flexible work and other labor market characteristics.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 132 - Next  Jump:

©2018 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy