Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 7,191 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1439 - Next  Jump:
2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 489 words || 
Info
1. Goldberg, Jessica., Bumgarner, Erin., jacobs, francine., Contreras, Mariah., Fosse, Nathan., Raskin, Maryna., Easterbrooks, Ann. and Mistry, Jayanthi. "Measuring Program Fidelity in the [Program Name] Home Visiting Program" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p962730_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010), states have received over $1.5 billion for evidence-based home visiting programs, yet questions remain about how faithfully such programs are being implemented. This question is crucial for contextualizing program effects that vary considerably depending on how faithfully programs operate according to model standards (Durlak & DuPre, 2008). The proposed study informs this discussion by describing two indices of fidelity created for a statewide home visiting model evaluation. Guided by Carroll and colleagues (2007), who identified five aspects of fidelity measurement (i.e., adherence to the model, dosage, quality of service delivery, participant engagement/responsiveness, and identification of successful program elements) – we configured two indices of model fidelity: (1) program-level fidelity scores, reflecting the degree to which programs operated as intended by the model, and (2) individual-level fidelity scores, reflecting the degree to which individual evaluation participants used services as the model intends. We then explored associations between indices of fidelity and (a) maternal characteristics, and (b) other indices of program operations (e.g., duration). Finally, using a multi-level modeling (MLM) framework, we explored whether mother and child outcomes varied as a function of fidelity.
Fidelity scores were calculated using data from the program’s MIS, in which home visitors recorded all program-related activities. Data covered four fiscal years. Eleven indicators of fidelity were selected from the program’s “critical program elements” (see Table 1); both individual- and program-level fidelity scores ranged from 0 to 1, where 0 = total lack of fidelity to the program model and 1 = total adherence to the model. Program-level fidelity scores were calculated for all programs sites statewide (n = 26), averaged across fiscal years, and then assigned to each evaluation participant based on the program in which she spent the most time. Individual-level fidelity scores were calculated as a proportion of the indicators met by each evaluation participant (n = 433).
There was greater variability in individual-level fidelity scores compared to program-level fidelity (see Figure 1). Average program-level fidelity scores were quite high (M = 0.74, range 0.71- 0.80). In contrast, individual-level fidelity scores were widely distributed (M = 0.54, SD = 0.24). Program-level fidelity was not related to most indicators of mothers’ utilization, in contrast to individual-level fidelity And while program-level fidelity was not related to most maternal characteristics, Individual-level fidelity was related to several (e.g., depression, employment, living arrangements). MLM analyses indicated that outcomes varied depending on program-level fidelity; for example, mothers in higher fidelity programs had a lower probability of cigarette smoking and drug use, and had children who scored higher on child responsiveness. Unlike the case of program-level fidelity, associations between individual-level fidelity and outcomes were not always in the expected direction. For example, mothers with higher individual-level fidelity scores were less likely to have a repeat birth within two years, but more likely to report intimate partner violence. These results suggest additional program strategies for participant outreach and engagement.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 156 words || 
Info
2. Pompoco, Amanda., Lugo, Melissa., Sullivan, Carrie. and Latessa, Edward. "An Interactive Examination of Prison Programs in One State: Is it a Program or a Song?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 17, 2015 <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1039832_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In 2011, the University of Cincinnati was hired to evaluate prison programs in a Midwestern state. To date, over 200 reentry programs have been assessed using different versions of the CPC during site visits to prisons. The state’s department of corrections provided UCCI staff with lists of all available prison programs. This poster presents and analyzes unique program names under multiple domains that were reviewed during the data analysis stage of the project. In addition to presenting findings concerning the effect of participation in prison programs on misconduct and recidivism, this poster encourages active participation. Specifically, observers will have the opportunity to guess whether the name of a program is in fact a prison program or if it is a song title. This poster seeks to illustrate the parallels between unique prison program names that attempt to entice offender participation. Additionally, observers will win small prizes by guessing a certain number of the programs correctly.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 198 words || 
Info
3. Shannon, Lisa., Jones, Afton., Newell, Jennifer. and Perkins, Elizabeth. "Examining Gender Differences in Factors Associated with Program Completion in a Statewide Drug Court Program" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1147004_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Substance use among women has received limited attention because it has been viewed as a more predominant problem among males; however there is an increasing awareness that treatment needs for women and men are different. The study purpose was to examine factors which may uniquely impact females and males in completing drug court. Study participants were 534 drug court participants randomly selected from the larger Kentucky Drug Court (KDC) participant population (N = 4,881). Secondary data, including the program assessment, MIS, and CourtNet records were utilized to examine pre-program information as well as during program performance in relation to program completion. The female (n = 212) logistic regression analysis showed three variables were significantly associated with program completion: employment at baseline, intravenous opiate use, and conviction of a misdemeanor traffic crime before drug court. The male (n = 322) logistic regression analyses showed seven variables were significantly associated with program completion: outpatient treatment referrals, education, living with parents at baseline, short-term treatment referrals, number of positive drug screens, having a curfew sanction, and number of incarceration sanction days. This information can be used to identify ways to improve the drug court experience by making it more gender specific.

2017 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 198 words || 
Info
4. Kasperowski, Dick. and Hillman, Thomas. "The Culture of Contribution in Citizen Science: Programs and Anti-programs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston MA, Aug 30, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1272493_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Citizen science projects are often designed to minimize learning as a necessity for mass mobilization, however such processes are outside the control of owners of projects. Projects aiming for scientific output (peer-reviewed publications) must have an instance in the scientific process were citizens are constructed as on par with scientists to assure data quality. These instances are often situated in the participatory protocols (programs) harnessing some kind of ability of the crowd, which make their participation and contributions valid for scientific work. At the same time, citizen science projects also uphold boundaries between citizens and scientists. Intuitively, this might not be necessary as scientists by their professional training have abilities beyond what is possible for volunteer contributors. In practice such boundaries are not so clear. The aim of this paper is to explore when and how such boundaries are challenged as learning is occurring on behalf of contributors in citizen science projects. The purpose is to illuminate the relationship between the citizen scientists as constructed as contributor to science with specific, but static qualities (programs), and the development of contributors over time (anti-programs). Data consists of interactions between researchers and contributors on discussion forums of citizen science projects.

2017 - Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action Words: 296 words || 
Info
5. Rae, Jennifer., Aubry, Tim., Samosh, Jonathan. and Shah, Dhrasti. "Assessing the Program Fidelity of the Supported Housing Addiction Recovery Program in Ottawa, Canada" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, <Not Available>. 2018-06-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1238636_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In 2010, the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) Ottawa branch and the Sandy Hill Community Health Centre (SHCHC) received funding from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care to develop the Supported Housing Addiction Recovery Program (SHARP). The two agencies work in partnership to deliver the program: CMHA is responsible for the housing portion of the program, with a housing coordinator administering a total of 96 rent supplements for private-market housing, while the Oasis program at SHCHC is responsible for delivering Intensive Case Management (ICM) support. The SHARP program is intended to serve people who are homeless and have problematic substance use and/or concurrent disorders.
Since the development of the SHARP program, researchers at the University of Ottawa have been involved in conducting implementation and impact evaluations of the program. The program has reached a stage of developmental maturity in its program operations, and has demonstrated promising results, particularly in contributing to housing stability. In 2016, researchers conducted a fidelity assessment of the program to investigate the extent to which it was adhering to common standards of the Pathways Housing First approach.
The results of the fidelity assessment will be presented in the proposed symposium. The symposium will explore the factors contributing to the overall high fidelity of the program, as well as the challenges and barriers that led to some areas of low fidelity, such as a lack of peer specialist and vocational support. Audience members will learn about how Housing First has been adapted in the context of an urban Canadian setting, with a population of high-needs clients with problematic substance use and/or concurrent disorders. Audience members will participate in a discussion of how Housing First programs can overcome obstacles to fidelity and continue to be improved to better meet the needs of clients.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1439 - Next  Jump:

©2018 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy