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2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 4840 words || 
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1. Lin, Julian., Chuan, Chan. and Rivera, Milagros. "A Comparison of Five Functions in the PDA: Importance, Ease of Use, Usefulness and Intention to Use" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 22, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2017-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p230953_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Many devices – for example, a multi-functional printer and a mobile phone – have integrated many distinct functions into one single unit. Previous research in the acceptance studies, specifically studies examining multi-functional devices, continues to examine the adoption of these technologies by applying an overall evaluation. Analyzing different functions separately is important as these functions may be unique. Especially, some individual functions – such as a camera or an mp3 player which is integrated in a mobile phone – are still sold separately. Drawing upon studies on information systems acceptance, this paper analyzes phone, organizer, Internet access, camera, and mp3 player, the five functions, in the PDA. A survey with more than 200 respondents showed that perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of each function in the PDA can explain about 47 to 67 percent of the variance in usage intention of its function. Implications for manufactures of such a device are discussed.

2004 - American Association for Public Opinion Research Words: 231 words || 
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2. Biemer, Paul. and Wright, Douglas. "Estimating Cocaine Use Using the Item Count Methodology: Preliminary Results from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Pointe Hilton Tapatio Cliffs, Phoenix, Arizona, May 11, 2004 <Not Available>. 2017-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p115854_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The item count method allows survey respondents to remain anonymous when reporting a sensitive behavior such as cocaine use. This is accomplished by including the sensitive behavior of interest in a list of other relatively non-stigmatizing behaviors. The respondent reports only number of items in the list in which he/she has engaged, not which behaviors. If the average number of non-stigmatizing behaviors is known for the population, one can estimate the rate of the sensitive behavior for the population by the difference between the average number of behaviors reported for the population including and excluding the stigmatized behavior. A very large test of this methodology (n=70,000 persons) was conducted for the NSDUH in 2001 in order to estimate past year cocaine use. The project involved cognitive laboratory research to determine the number of item count questions that should be included and the topics to be covered by those questions (other than cocaine use). In addition, replications of item count questions were embedded in the questionnaire in order to estimate the response variance associated with the item count methodology. This paper reports on the results of the cognitive testing and the estimates of cocaine use that were obtained from the item count methodology. We also report on the results of the response error analysis which helps to explain the poor results obtained by the method.

2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 104 words || 
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3. Kim, KiDeuk. and Bieler, Samuel. "Use Skills or Use Math? Implications of Using Actuarial Risk Assessment Instruments" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2017-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p665518_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Findings of this study suggest that the predictive accuracy of actuarial assessments for determining future recidivism are superior to clinical assessments and less influenced by the demographic characteristics of the offender being assessed. To support these conclusions, we compare actuarial and clinical assessments of nearly 2,000 defendants who were booked into a jail and subjected to pretrial risk assessment. This study presents results from receiver operating characteristic regression models providing empirical support for the popular belief that actuarial risk assessments outperform clinical judgments in predicating recidivism. We also provide implications for policy and research beyond which approach produces a more accurate prediction of recidivism.

2012 - AECT International Convention Words: 71 words || 
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4. Wang, Chun-Min (Arthur). "Using VoiceThread for Cross-cultural Online Collaboration: The Perspectives from Taiwanese College Students Using VoiceThread for Cross-cultural Online Collaboration: The Perspectives from Taiwanese College Students Using VoiceThread for Cross-cultura" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AECT International Convention, The Galt House, Louisville, KY, Oct 30, 2012 <Not Available>. 2017-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p574479_index.html>
Publication Type: Concurrent Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this study, a Web 2.0 tool called VoiceThread was applied into a cross-cultural collaboration project between the college students from the United States and Taiwan. By analyzing Taiwanese students’ reflection essays and the questionnaire regarding the overall learning experience, the study intends to identify important elements of designing and developing cross-cultural online learning environment, and also suggests how to better use VoiceThread in cross-cultural projects for teaching and learning purpose.

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